Browsing Tag

Mural

a Mural {8}

Jo Arellanes, Atlanta Photographer, Painter, Mural, Magnolia Pregnancy Resources, LeahAndMark.com (1)

{photos and words | +jo}

 

Holy Moly! This past week went by really fast. Ok, hope you’re ready for a simple tutorial on how to paint clouds.

It really is pretty simple. {And, yes, I know you might not believe me at all… but trust me it is.}

Jo Arellanes, Atlanta Photographer, Painter, Mural, Magnolia Pregnancy Resources, LeahAndMark.com (5)

 

What you need:
2 kinds of light blue, one slightly darker than the other
White paint
Sponge, preferably natural

With everything that I’ve done with this mural, I’m mixing my own colors. I don’t like using a color straight out of the can/tube for many reasons. Mostly, because it’s boring. Anyways, have fun and mix up your own colors!

Jo Arellanes, Atlanta Photographer, Painter, Mural, Magnolia Pregnancy Resources, LeahAndMark.com (6)

You can sketch out the clouds if you want but be careful because the dark lead will muddle with the colors and you might end up with stormy clouds instead of happy clouds. {If you get the reference – you’re awesome. 😉 } I simply had an idea in mind because of the pilimary sketch I did at the very beginning.

Mix the slightly darker blue paint with a little bit of water so the sponge would grab it easier and dabbed away. You don’t have to be precise with the first color because it is there for the silhouette and shadows. You don’t want it completely filled in either because light bounces all around inside clouds due to light refracting through water, etc… You don’t have to think about all that. Just dab out a cloud like shape.

Jo Arellanes, Atlanta Photographer, Painter, Mural, Magnolia Pregnancy Resources, LeahAndMark.com (4)

 

Next, add water to the lighter bue paint and begin to dab away with it. This layer is for the mid-tone values so don’t cover up all the base blue paint. You need it to show through. You want to show the volume and depth the clouds have with this layer.

Jo Arellanes, Atlanta Photographer, Painter, Mural, Magnolia Pregnancy Resources, LeahAndMark.com (3)

Lastly, take the white {no water this time} and find where your light source is. What ever direction it is coming from dab a little bit of white along the edge of the cloud. And think about where the light is touching the interior of the cloud as well.

Now you’ve made your own happy cloud. 🙂

Here are a few of the ones I painted over at Magnolia Pregnancy Resources. 

Jo Arellanes, Atlanta Photographer, Painter, Mural, Magnolia Pregnancy Resources, LeahAndMark.com (2)

I’m almost done with this project – it’s getting down to the nitty gritty and a lot of detail work to finish it up. The next time I post about the mural will be the last one and it will be a doozy.

I hoped you enjoyed this little tutorial. Let me know if you tried it and how your clouds turned out.
~*~

P.S. If you want to get caught up on the other installments, here they are!
{Frist}   |  {Second}   |   {Third}   |   {Fourth}   |    {Fifth}   |    {Sixth}   |    {Seventh} 

a Mural {7}

Jo Arellanes | Atlanta Photographer | Eric Ward | Painter | Mural | Magnolia Pregnancy Resources | LeahAndMark.com (3)

{photos and words | +jo}

 

There were a couple extra people with me over at Magnolia Pregnancy Resources this time.
Eric came by again to continue to work on the lady.

AND Intern Edwin came by to check out the progress. It was a little different working while someone else was around simply to watch. But Eric and I forged ahead steadily. Eventually we both began talking about the painting techniques we were using. I had a dry-brush technique for the shaded grassy areas whereas Eric used a combination of washes.

If you are unfamiliar with those terms, here’s a simple breakdown:

Dry-Brush: is a painting technique in which a paint brush that is relatively dry, but still holds paint, is used. Load is applied to a dry support such as paper or primed canvas. The resulting brush strokes have a characteristic scratchy look that lacks the smooth appearance that washes or blended paint commonly have.
Wash: is a painting technique in which a paint brush that is very wet with solvent and holds a small paint load is applied to a wet or dry support such as paper or primed or raw canvas. The result is a smooth and uniform area that ideally lacks the appearance of brush strokes and is semi-transparent.

 

Through out the conversation Eric and I both reflected on our opposite backgrounds and experiences at SCAD. Though we both started off in opposite directions we somehow managed to end up together and because of our diverse backgrounds work well together. Plus, it’s kinda epic making a wall transform and tell a story.

Till next week.
{I’ll show you how to make clouds} 🙂

~*~

 

 

~~~~~~~~~~UPDATE~~~~~~~~~~

{Frist}   |  {Second}   |   {Third}   |   {Fourth}   |    {Fifth}   |    {Sixth}   |    {Seventh}    |   {Eighth}

a mural {6}

Jo Arellanes | Atlanta Photographer | Eric Ward | Painter | Mural | Magnolia Pregnancy Resources | LeahAndMark.com (4)

{photos and words +jo}

This week’s update on the mural over at Magnolia Pregnancy Resources. 
Have you ever been satisfied with something and then, after some time has passed, you look a the thing and realized it was crap?
Yeah. Me too.

I’ve never been fantastic at figure drawing. I’m one of the many artist who hides behind “my style.” In this situation it was completely unacceptable.
So I brought in my best friend and greatest ally in any battle.
Eric.

Together we tackled the walls. I continued to press forward with detailing the hills. He took to the immense task of correcting the figure in the painting. I had already briefed him on the concept and gave him intel of sketches and the option to adapt.


And soon the evolution happened. Slowly, in sync with the hills, the figure began to transform. A new painting blossomed.

It’s was funny, looking back through the photos, seeing how both Eric and I rhythmically stood away from the wall to see the totality of the work.  It’s an essential part of the process. You can’t keep yourself buried nose first into the sands of whatever project you are working on. You have to step away and gain a full perspective. And often. Otherwise the end result will be poo.

Eric’s background is quite different and similar to my own. We both went to SCAD and would not be the artist we are if we had not attended. He will continue to help out on this project for the next couple weeks. It will be 10,000x better for it.

But, then again, I’m a little biased. 😉

Till next week,
~*~

 

 

~~~~~~~~~~UPDATE~~~~~~~~~~

{Frist}   |  {Second}   |   {Third}   |   {Fourth}   |    {Fifth}   |    {Sixth}   |    {Seventh}    |   {Eighth}